Saturday, October 27, 2007

Introduction

I was born and raised in the Assemblies of God, a denomination of the Protestant Pentecostal tradition of Christianity. For a while I was a minister in this denomination. However, at one point I was introduced to the writings of the Church Fathers. I found a level of faith and practice that was revolutionary, profound, and consistent with everything I had read in the New Testament. This set me on a journey to re-capture this ethic. In the course of time I left the AG and joined a new denomination called the Charismatic Episcopal Church. There, I learned more of the ancient faith. I thought, prayed, and reflected further on my journey. I briefly held ordination as a priest within this group. But I was still searching. I knew I was still looking for something more. Eventually I came to believe that I was looking for the Catholic Church. And so I continued to study, pray, and have conversation. I was recently received into the Catholic Church with my family. But my pilgrimage continues.

I no longer feel that I need to find another church, or tradition. I am convinced of the truth of the Catholic Church. I believe with all my heart this is the Church that Christ founded. It is the one, true Church. That is not to say that truth cannot be found outside of it. But, simply, I believe the fullness of truth resides here. However, having said that, I still long for the radical lifestyle lived out by those early Christians and imitated by countless saints through the ages.

In my short time within the Catholic Church, I have found many exemplary individuals who have borne witness to me of this ancient and precious faith. Yet, I am painfully aware that in the main there are a number of areas where the ancient faith and its modern (read popular) practice part ways. It is here that I still find myself on a pilgrimage. For I want nothing less than the complete imitation of Christ, and full communion with Him. I long for a complete integration of my faith such that my thoughts and actions will mirror His in this present world.

I intend to use this blog as a means to place in writing what I am feeling or thinking. I invite you, my readers, to feel free to interact with me if you so choose.

9 comments:

Joni said...

I like it!

You may want to change your settings, though. This doesn't allow anonymous comments. In other words, someone has to have a Google Account in order to leave a comment. Just a thought.

Keith said...

I changed the setting so anyone can comment. Thanks for the heads up.

Ken Follis said...

Keith,
This is a great testimony and blog! I am glad you started one. It would be neat to know how many folks there are like us who have read Bercot's books and made their way into the Catholic Church. Former CEC Fr. George Sanders did and he has been accepted as a seminarian. Have you heard of Chris Padgett? He did as well. I am presently corresponding with one Anglican who read Bercot who is investigating the Catholic Church.
Ken

Keith said...

Ken,
Thanks for the compliments. Yes, it would be interesting to know. The funny thing is that Bercot himself remains adamantly anti-Catholic and outside of any apostolic communion. It's too bad. I think if he went all the way, a lot more would follow him.

Hidden One said...

Who's Bercot? Anyway, Joni sent me over here, so I think I'll read the other posts now...

Oh, and I've heard of Chris Padgett. His song "Please" is on my iTunes.

Keith said...

Hi Hidden One,

Good to hear from you. I've seen your blogs. I was Patrick who wrote Patrick's Ponderings for a while.

Anyway, Bercot is a Protestant who thinks the Anabaptist stream of Protestantism best imitates the early Christian Fathers. I disagree with him, but he has still written some things that are very helpful as an introduction to the Fathers. He is a good writer and his books are easy reading.

J. said...

Keith, I too have returned to my Catholic roots. I was with the AG for about 17 years. In fact, I remember you and your wife working at the Christian bookstore, when you worked at TC and when you became a Anglican. Anyway, I did not come back to my roots in the same way as you but I agree in Catholicism there is a "fullness of faith", a greater depth. I was stunned to experience Christ in the Eucharist and joy in all the discoveries that followed. The Catholic faith is able to bring to completion from our birth to our resurrection. And everything we endure and suffer is useful to share in the sufferings of Christ. Through our priestly prayers we don't have to be overwhelmed with life, but offer up sacrifices for the salvation of mankind's soul. It is indeed good news! I have not adopted every teaching but I am searching too with an open heart. I just want to know the fullness of Christ. Thanks for your blog, Judy Williford

Anonymous said...

I am grieved at our loss, and am dumbfounded as to why one would willingly walk into a church that has refused to break free from the chains of darkness . I will continue to pray for you that you find salvation in the words of Jesus Christ and not in the words of mankind. I will always remember the good times we had in fellowship

Keith said...

Anonymous,

I assure you I am not in darkness, bondage, or the words of men. Quite the contrary, I have found the fullness of our Lord's Church and, naturally, a much fuller revelation of our Lord Himself. If you haven't read the posts that follow this one I encourage you to do so. It will explain a lot more about this.